Category Archives: History of Gippsland

Coalies Weekend: Yallourn North Ghost Tour

Yallourn North Ghost Tour running the 7th and 8th of November 2015

Yallourn North Ghost Tour running the 7th and 8th of November 2015

Yallourn North Ghost Tours 8th November 2015 8pm

Coalies weekend

Coalies is the name the people who used to live in the Brown Coal Mine call themselves. It’s annual catch up of reminiscing and visiting the place they call(ed) home.

We’d love to meet some of the Coalies, hear their reactions to the tour.

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Yallourn North Ghost Tour

Haunted Hills Tours is running a ghost tour in Yallourn North on Coalies Weekend the 7th and 8th of November at 8pm.

The format is a walking tour of Yallourn North, going to public spaces that have a tragic past and there are spirits remaining. It also covers a places we cannot walk too.  Yallourn North is a lot older than it looks. There are quite a few ghostly tales, we walk for about five minute intervals between stories.

Join us for a guided walking tour back-in-time a chance to experience history, the paranormal and bizarre. Be drawn back with tales from Yallourn, Brown Coal Mine and the evocatively named Haunted Hills.

Duration: 1 hour and half

Tickets $25 ($20 concession)
Family rate available

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Terms and conditions:
Tell you’re friends your going by joining our event of Facebook.
Next tour: Friday the 13th of November 2015, at 8pm

Yallourn North Ghost Tour – upcoming dates

 

Yallourn North was the first town Haunted Hills Tours opened with Ghost Tours.

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Yallourn North is a lovely town in the Latrobe Valley, it was originally called the Brown Coal Mine, because it was built on the edge of a mine, called the Brown Coal Mine.  The community here care about their town and share their town with some paranormal entities.

There are places in Yallourn North the locals will more quickly believe is haunted, it doesn’t look old but settlers started making their home in the late 1800s.

Come along to discover the secrets that hide in plain sight on these streets.

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Tour dates for Yallourn North Ghost Tour:

December 12th, 2015 at 8pm- 9:30pm
December 18th, 2015 at 9:30pm – 11pm
December 29th, 2015 at 9:30pm – 11pm
January 3rd, 2016 at 9:30pm – 11pm
January 16th, 2016 at 9:30pm – 11pm
February 26, 2015 at 9:30pm – 11pm

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Past tour galleries:

First tour

March Tour

April Tour

August Tour

A brief history of Moe

A brief history of Moe

A brief history of Moe

Moe was originally named Mowie or Little Moi, which is the local Aboriginal words for swamp, and it was a swamp with regular floods in the early days. Gold brought hopeful prospectors in 1852 who established themselves in Narracan The gold exhausted quickly and farming became the industry. The railway coming through energised the township, especially at the time when it was the interchange to Yallourn, Thorpdale and Walhalla, as well as on the line to Sale. The railway created jobs for Moe residents.

The swamp, Moe’s namesake, created jobs in helping reclaim the land, in 1903 the Narracan Shire Council discussed the further public works required to preserve the 10 mile drain and stop it silting.

The swamp land reclaimed left incredibly fertile land for crops that were grown of high satin quality, and reared cattle that turned over 6 tons of butter a week at the nearby Trafalgar Milk Factory. This made farming and agriculture very well.

The Settlers started applying for crown grants for the land, however 6 months later they were all denied.

Yallourn was built in 1924ish and this also boosted commerce in Moe, as a lot of people who lived in Yallourn, shopped in Moe. The reason for this was the shops owned by the SEC were expensive and clothes weren’t displayed aesthitically, this was learned after a royal commission from a bush fire that ravaged Yallourn. Of course when Yallourn came along the power industry also employed a large portion of Moe residents.

Moe didn’t get the gold rush money, and as a result most of the founding buildings were built out of wood, very few have survived. The Bush Hospital started in the 1800’s still stands today as a private dwelling. Edward Hunter the namesake to the Edward Hunter reserve, was president of the Bush Hospital and on many other boards in Moe at the turn of the 20th century.

Moe has a diverse history, located in a stunning spot, close to nature, with great amenities as it always has…

Gallery of Moe’s History

If you click on the pictures you can make them bigger and click to see the next one enlarged also. 

Author/Creator: Rose Stereograph Co Date(s): c1920-1954 Capturefile: D:glass neg rawsbox 382rg008365.tif CaptureSN: CC001681.046135 Software: Capture One PRO for Windows Link to digitised item: http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/58395 Link to this record: http://search.slv.vic.gov.au/MAIN:SLV_VOYAGER1641712

Author/Creator: Rose Stereograph Co
Date(s): c1920-1954 Capturefile:
D:glass neg rawsbox 382rg008365.tif
CaptureSN: CC001681.046135
Software: Capture One PRO for Windows
Link to digitised item: http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/58395
Link to this record: http://search.slv.vic.gov.au/MAIN:SLV_VOYAGER1641712

Author/Creator: Victorian Railways, photographer. Date(s): ca. 1945-ca. 1954 Capturefile: D:glass neg rawsLTGN 5box 01vr000004.tif CaptureSN: CC001681.075196 Software: Capture One PRO for Windows Link to digitised item: http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/95899 Link to this record: http://search.slv.vic.gov.au/MAIN:SLV_VOYAGER1738725

Author/Creator: Victorian Railways, photographer.
Date(s): ca. 1945-ca. 1954
Capturefile: D:glass neg rawsLTGN 5box 01vr000004.tif
CaptureSN: CC001681.075196
Software: Capture One PRO for Windows
Link to digitised item: http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/95899
Link to this record: http://search.slv.vic.gov.au/MAIN:SLV_VOYAGER1738725

 Title: GEORGE STREET, MOE, VIC. [picture] Author/Creator: Rose Stereograph Co Date(s): c1920-1954 Capturefile: D:glass neg rawsbox 382rg008362.tif CaptureSN: CC001681.046129 Software: Capture One PRO for Windows Link to digitised item: http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/58646 Link to this record: http://search.slv.vic.gov.au/MAIN:SLV_VOYAGER1641708


Title:
GEORGE STREET, MOE, VIC. [picture]
Author/Creator: Rose Stereograph Co
Date(s): c1920-1954
Capturefile: D:glass neg rawsbox 382rg008362.tif
CaptureSN: CC001681.046129
Software: Capture One PRO for Windows
Link to digitised item: http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/58646
Link to this record: http://search.slv.vic.gov.au/MAIN:SLV_VOYAGER1641708

How different is present day Moore Street? Title: GEORGE STREET, MOE, VIC. [picture] Author/Creator: Rose Stereograph Co Date(s): c1920-1954 Capturefile: D:glass neg rawsbox 382rg008363.tif CaptureSN: CC001681.046132 Software: Capture One PRO for Windows Link to digitised item: http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/58288 Link to this record: http://search.slv.vic.gov.au/MAIN:SLV_VOYAGER1641709

How different is present day Moore Street?
Title:
GEORGE STREET, MOE, VIC. [picture]
Author/Creator: Rose Stereograph Co
Date(s): c1920-1954
Capturefile: D:glass neg rawsbox 382rg008363.tif
CaptureSN: CC001681.046132
Software: Capture One PRO for Windows
Link to digitised item: http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/58288
Link to this record: http://search.slv.vic.gov.au/MAIN:SLV_VOYAGER1641709

 Title: BUTTER FACTORY, MOE, VIC. [picture] Author/Creator: Rose Stereograph Co Date(s): c1920-1954 Capturefile: D:glass neg rawsbox 382rg008368.tif CaptureSN: CC001681.046139 Software: Capture One PRO for Windows Link to digitised item: http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/58608 Link to this record: http://search.slv.vic.gov.au/MAIN:SLV_VOYAGER1641717


Title:
BUTTER FACTORY, MOE, VIC. [picture]
Author/Creator: Rose Stereograph Co
Date(s): c1920-1954 Capturefile: D:glass neg rawsbox 382rg008368.tif
CaptureSN: CC001681.046139
Software: Capture One PRO for Windows
Link to digitised item: http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/58608
Link to this record: http://search.slv.vic.gov.au/MAIN:SLV_VOYAGER1641717

Book Review: Great Gippsland Mysteries

Grant Robinson a local Gippsland resident wrote Great Gippsland Mysteries published in 2014.

This book came out of an experience Grant had when he was 11 (you’ll have to read the book to find out) that led him to a lifelong journey, that includes a Bachelor of Applied Mathematics and Diploma of Education and interest in the paranormal especially local experiences.

Gippsland’s Cryptoids:

The book opens looking at Cryptiods, or mysterious and rare creatures. Grant takes a chronological and evidence based approach to exploring these issues, he uses first person accounts. It shapes a fascinating tale, some of the stories you may have known. This section of the book covers ‘The Wonthaggi Monster’, ‘Yarram Elephant’, and ‘Gunyah Lion’ (which I call the Gippsland Lion). The second chapter is devoted to big cats and the sightings of those all over Gippsland.

Grant follows the recent sightings of these creatures, and as much information as there is about them.

Gippsland’s UFOs

Chapter three is massive and spans from 1909 to 2009 with sightings of UFO’s, stories of abductions, disappearances, missing time and pictures. He also covers a case of an Unidentified Sunken Object (USO) as well. The first hand accounts are fascinating and packaged well within the book.

Gippsland’s ghosts and hauntings

The book covers Gippsland’s ghost and haunting in part but one of the things I love about what Grant writes is later when he gives his summary explanation of these things. And says:

I believe I am one of the fortunate people to have literally touched the afterlife.

I love the way he has phrased that, and it gives an insight into the positive feelings he has about the paranormal.

I believe I am one of the fortunate people on this earth to have literally touched the afterlife - Grant Robinson - Great Gippsland Mysteries

I believe I am one of the fortunate people on this earth to have literally touched the afterlife – Grant Robinson – Great Gippsland Mysteries

The book also covers, mysterious deaths, lost treasure, ship wrecks and more!

You can purchase Great Gippsland Mysteries from here or most bookshops across Gippsland. from: http://www.promcountryhistory.org.au/publications/great-gippsland-mysteries-grant-robinson-bsc/

A brief history of Morwell

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morwell-history-photo-of-waterfall-by-https-flic-kr-p-rf96dh-morwell-coal-mine-picture-http-search-slv-vic-gov-au-primo_library-libweb-action-dldisplay-do-vidmaindocidslv_voyager2

Morwell (Morewell) is a version of the local Aboriginal words – More willie meaning Woolly Possum. This was orginally the name of a homestead built on the side of the Morwell River in the 1840s.

The shire of Morwell was established in 1892. In a great geographical position. Stephen M. Legg for the Morwell Centenary in 1992 wrote a book called the Heart of the Valley. In it he writes about the natural beauty surrounding Morwell. “Three imposing features provide the natural setting for the 650 square kilometre Morwell Shire – the Eastern Highlands which for the backbone of the country to the north, the Strzelecki Ranges that rise to the south and west and the Gippsland Basin which lies between them. These three landscape elements form a natural ampitheatre in the west, with ramparts surrounding the easterly flowing Latrobe River and it’s tributaries on three sides.” 

The pioneers McMillan found Morwell in 1840. Set up as a changing station for the horses or stage coaches on the way to Sale before the train line was put in 1870s. Farmers came in droves, clearing land planting crops. It was also called “Morewell” spelt like that.

Coal was found all over the valley and many companies emerged between 1886 and 1894. Coal was a very expensive venture and didn’t take off until the Victorian Government bought up all the coal licences in 1916. This move was prompted in part due to coal miners strikes in Newcastle (NSW).

Gold was found in the Morwell River, but not enough for commercial viability.

Morwell’s location makes it a great place with accessibility to the snow, beach and bush. Morwell used to have a butter factory, cordial factory, oil factory and gas production.

Moondarra State Park

Moondarra State Park is a lovely spot North of Yallourn North accessible from Moe-Walhalla Road. The park is huge there are lots of four wheel drive tracks, in the the drive car there was no possibility of taking those. A sign pointing to a bitchumen road promised the Moondarra Res’ (and the Moe Gun Club). This road led to a lovely reserve on the East side of the Moondarra Reservoir. This is a well maintained reserved with lovely grassy areas, a number of things to discover while strolling around. (If this blog doesn’t get the word out about the park it almost feels like it’s your own private gardens – that you don’t have to work to maintain.) There was also history to discover.

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Gould

The town of Gould was formerly here, it could be said this town was dammed. This town seems to have slipped quietly into the Moondarra Dam. Different to other towns, it was never officially “crowned town”. The Brown’s, Siddle’s,Taylor’s and Master’s owned land on the edge of the Tyers River.  There was land where a school was built, and a public hall. Even though it wasn’t officially a town the town had no problem with mail delivery.

The school built by the locals with some government assistance, opened in 1914 with Miss Gibbons and Miss Campey was the head teacher.

The Tyers river was a popular fishing spot on the weekend. The locals fed themselves by fishing, raising pork and growing tick beans. The locals also grew maize, although the parrots ate so much of it.

The public shelter at the Moondarra reservoir is said to be the Cecil Inn relocated when the town was moved on.

Morgan had sawmill at Jacobs Creek he used to take the wood into Moe via horse in the early days, when Gould’s railway was finished he linked a tramway to the railway making transport easier.

In 1959 the Moondarra reservoir commenced building, it took two years to build, taking away the entire township of Gould.

 

 

This is from (http://www.walhallarail.com/_Media/gould_station085.jpg) it’s gould station, with a water tower and those hills look familar in the distance.

 

Yallourn North, Brown Coal Mine, Halls Bay, Lake Narracan, History

Brown Coal Mine

Yallourn North previously known as the Brown Coal Mine

The building of the post office brought about the naming and the official start of the Brown Mine Coal township in 1917. After World War II it was renamed Yallourn North.

Yallourn North, Brown Coal Mine, Halls Bay, Lake Narracan, History

Yallourn North formerly known as the Brown Coal Mine. A Brief History.
The pictures above are: Left: Halls Bay looks left from the main car park. Second in from the left, is the arrangement out the front of the Old Brown Coal Mine museum, the third is the photo from the State Library of Victoria of the Brown Coal mine built on the edge of the mine, right is from a point to the west of Yallourn North looking towards Yallourn North.

The official start of the Brown Coal Mine township would probably come as a bit of surprise to the original settler. Who owned 135 acres bordering the Morwell Shire with Anderson Creek flowing through. His name was Andors Anderson and he settled here around 1884. He dug into a hillside and compacted the dirt into a floor, putting up a front he created a dwelling. For a time only he only lived here from Friday to Sunday, as he worked in Traralgon. He walked the 18 miles to Traralgon and stayed there from Monday to Thursday. Skilled with a whittle and willow, he made sporting equipment, like cricket bats. He planted the willows as they’re not a native species of tree to the Brown Coal Mine area.
Brown Coal or lignite coal was discovered after a land-slip on the side of Latrobe River banks, near Tom’s bridge, around 1879. Further investigation of mine shafts dug revealed more coal. Brown gold, coal. Henry Godridge, who discovered it, didn’t have enough capital to mine it himself. He spent the next ten years looking for investors, he found some in the Morwell Coal Mining company. The Brown Coal Mine was known as ‘The Hill’ during the time and is still sometimes still referred to as the ‘The Hill’. This venture wasn’t profitable and became difficult and they started looking for new investors. The Brown Coal Mine experienced a boom, as rumours surfaced that the State Government was taking over. People flocked to the town. There was 3 grocers, 2 butchers, 3 boarding houses and other shops cropping up on Main St.

The Brown Coal Mine built on the edge of the Brown Coal Mine. Little shacks, some gum trees.  For original file you can see it - http://search.slv.vic.gov.au/primo_library/libweb/action/dlDisplay.do?vid=MAIN&docId=SLV_VOYAGER2027542&fn=permalink

The Brown Coal Mine built on the edge of the Brown Coal Mine. Little shacks, some gum trees. For original file you can see it – http://search.slv.vic.gov.au/primo_library/libweb/action/dlDisplay.do?vid=MAIN&docId=SLV_VOYAGER2027542&fn=permalink

One of the buildings was built without nails as they were in short supply after the first world war. There was even a  two-story houses made from tin. Most people assume the entire community of Brown Coal Mine and surrounds worked for the SEC.

The Meers men didn’t. Harry Meers built a grocery store, that was the go-to shop. His wife, Fanny ran a boarding house, later when Eda, his daughter was looking for work he bought her a restaurant to manage. His sons, worked in different jobs and moved away, one worked in the diary industry. another worked in the government Foundary at Footscray and the other a foreman on the NSW railways. The Meers moved to the Brown Coal Mine in 1916 and are also considered a founding family.
The SEC started building power plants in 1922. The Brown Coal Mine attracted people who didn’t want their employer and landlord as the same entity, or who wanted to own their own homes.

As the Brown Coal Mine grew people lived in boarding houses, until they saved up enough to buy or build a simple dwelling. As their needs changed or income freed up they’d build again.
In 1950 the town changed irrevocably, the mine destablised and Main Street being right on the edge of the mine. The Bakery split and other shops fittings pulled from the walls, 9 families were relocated. There are still discrepancies in how many or how much fell in to the mine. Luckily, no lives were lost. The bakers apprentice wasn’t so sure she’d survive for sometime as she held onto the edge of new mine.

This drove change, the shops relocated to where they are today on Reserve Street. While they rebuilt the shops, they also took down all the shanties and built houses in the 1950’s style. A lot of history was lost in the process.

Brown Coal Mine Township 10-9-1926

This is a photo of the Brown Coal Mine in 1929, the lone gum tree, the scub over near the mine. The tent like back of the roof on the right. It’s fascinating. http://search.slv.vic.gov.au/primo_library/libweb/action/dlDisplay.do?vid=MAIN&docId=SLV_VOYAGER2027520&fn=permalink

Join us on a Yallourn North Ghost Tour to hear about the paranormal and the secrets revealed!

The stories that haunt us

Further Reading:

Brown Coal Mine – Kath Rinigan
Welcome to Little Europe – The North Camp – by Joseph Sestokas
Various Yallourn North News editions
Wikipedia – Yallourn North.

Check for the upcoming ghost tours here:
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